NJADVP Conference 2017

$85.00

Clear
SKU: conf17

Description

Registration will be closed 6/21/2017 at 12 pm.

If you need to make changes to your registration please send an email to  ACampos@NJCEDV.org.

Morning workshop times: 10:30 – 12 noon

Responding to the Trauma in a Trauma Informed Way

Presenter: Catherine Hernesh, MA Advocates in the Domestic Violence field know how stressful and exhausting dealing with clients’ trauma from intimate partner violence can be, and many advocates have been trained and prepared to deal with the trauma of coercive control. As our shelters have been charged with accepting and supporting clients with more and more complex issues, many advocates have shared that they are unsure of how to approach clients who are overtly angry and acting out, who isolate, and/ or who present as emotionally shut down. This workshop will explore the reasons that these clients may present with various trauma responses, and how advocates can appropriately support traumatized clients by drawing on the training and skills they already possess. Through a combination of didactic slides, discussion, and activities, participants will come to understand how to support all levels of trauma and trauma response. Understanding of trauma-informed care and the importance of providing trauma-informed services to clients will be emphasized.

1.5 DVS Credits: Mental Health

NO MAS Violencia: Strategies utilized for an empowering educational and awareness tiered initiative for Latinas and providers, that addresses fears/barriers that many Latinas experience when contemplating reporting D/SV

Presenters: Elaine M. Hewins, CSW, DVS and Mariam Merced, MA Domestic/Sexual Violence (D/SV) affects millions of women each year. Latina immigrants may have unique experiences of abuse related to immigration status, increased isolation due to language/cultural barriers, and accessing resources due to cultural beliefs about the private nature of violence at home, and concerns about risk of deportation. These experiences may create barriers to reporting abuse, accessing services, and gaining safety. In 2016, Robert Wood Johnson University Hospital – Community Health Promotion Program’s NO MAS Violencia initiative aimed to tackle these unique barriers by bringing culturally and linguistically appropriate D/ SV information to this marginalized group, and to providers who interact with them. Their strategy focused on building on one of the major strengths of the Latino community; women helping women.

This workshop will highlight portions of the content covered at NO MAS Violencia workshops, such as reporting abuse to authorities when either the victim or perpetrator is undocumented, legal information about D/SV including restraining orders, U-Visas, and self-petitioning, and best practices. The workshop facilitators will share their successful strategies for reaching Latinas and providers and increasing their knowledge of D/SV prevention and intervention.

1.5 DVS Credits: Organizing for Change

Sold Out! Too Close to Home: When the Helper is Traumatized

Presenter: Robbin Loonan, MA, DVS, LPC Ten years ago, on a warm and sunny spring day, my world was shattered by violence. As a Domestic Violence Specialist, already in the field for over a decade, I was no stranger to the intricacies of domestic violence. Well-versed in the dynamics, statistics, and ramifications of family violence, I felt protected by my knowledge and expertise. Until that fateful day in May when the brutality of domestic violence hit much, much closer to home. In this workshop, Robbin will share her story of traumatization and healing. Her personal account will demonstrate how domestic violence does not discriminate; nobody is really immune. Offering both a personal and professional perspective on trauma, Ms. Loonan will help participants better understand Post Traumatic Stress Disorder, trauma symptomology, and how they may present clinically. The workshop will allow an in-depth understanding of both the short and long- term impact of trauma. Furthermore, this workshop will illuminate the importance of trauma informed treatment approaches and what helps to heal trauma. Issues such as meaning-making, grief, emotional safety, anniversaries, and triggers will be addressed.

1.5 DVS Credits: Mental Health

Addressing Violence Against Women with Developmental Disabilities

Presenters: Traci Burton, Coleen Roche and Leslie Malkin, BA, JD, DVS Studies suggest nearly 90% of women with disabilities have experienced some type of abuse in their lifetime. In particular, women with developmental disabilities are 3-10 times more likely than their non-disabled peers to experience abuse over longer periods of time.This session is designed to familiarize DV/SA professionals and volunteers with developmental disabilities, and how such disabilities affect both a survivor’s ability to seek services and the provider’s ability to render them effectively. The intersection of abuse and disability, safety planning, reporting issues, useful community resources and effective communication techniques will be discussed.

1.5 DVS Credits: Intervention Skills

Helping our Clients Face the Current Political World

Presenter: Lisa Smith, MS, DVS Many if not all of us were raised being told the phrase, “sticks and stones may break my bones but names will never hurt me”. This was usually shared after some kind of unpleasant encounter with a classmate. And of course the speaker, often a parent, was trying to make us feel better. At the first Republican Debate, then candidate Donald Trump said the biggest problem facing our country was political correctness. I was stunned. Political correctness is our biggest problem? Biggest problem for whom? This was just the beginning of the impact of the current administration. We had several clients who went into crisis after the election. Fast forward, and we have even more issues to deal with. Immigration, health insurance, family planning, education, the list goes on and on. This didactic workshop will explore some of the history surrounding current issues such as political correctness, immigration and health insurance. We will also discuss how to assist clients as they try and navigate this new frontier.

1.5 DVS Credits: Values and Attitudes

Be Bold! Maximizing our advocacy as 501(c)(3) public charities

Keely Monroe, Esq 501(c)(3)s play an important role in educating the public about policy issues and actions taken by their elected officials, including the President. Elected officials vote on bills, make public statements and executive decisions, or take other actions as part of their official duties. These actions may be consistent with or conflict with a nonprofit’s position on an issue. After this workshop you will have a clear understanding of how to maximize your advocacy, the kinds of advocacy activities 501(c)(3)s can engage in, when a communication is considered lobbying, and work through hypothetical situations so you develop a deeper understanding of the rules.

1.5 DVS Credits: Organizing for Change

 

Afternoon workshop times: 1:30 – 3pm

 

Immigration Options for Survivors of Domestic Violence

Presenter: Raquiba Huq, Esq. This workshop will cover the various forms of immigration applications that may be available to survivors of domestic violence and their children. The workshop will begin with a brief overview of the relevant immigration agencies and types of lawful immigration status. Then, we will turn to specific eligibility requirements for domestic violence-based immigration relief, including Violence Against Women Act self-petitions, U and T Visas, removal of conditions on legal permanent residency, and asylum. We will conclude with practice pointers for advocates to assist survivors in documenting their immigration applications.

1.5 DVS Credits: Legal

Creating Safe Spaces for LGBTQI+ Victims of Domestic Violence: One Small Step at a Time

Presenter: Kristine Raye, BA Intimate Partner Violence is a silent epidemic within the LGBTQI+ Community. Research indicates that domestic violence among same-sex couples occurs at similar rates as domestic violence among straight couples. Stigma, bias, fear of not being accepted and respected, and not knowing that there is help available, are just a few of the barriers that keep LGBTQI+ victims from seeking assistance and support. As professionals, advocates, and service providers, it is imperative that we are in the forefront of creating spaces that give LGBTQI+ victims of domestic violence a place where they can feel safe and heard. Through the use of visual presentation, handouts, technology, and information sharing, participants of this interactive workshop will begin to create a tangible road map on how to better serve LGBTQI+ victims of domestic violence specific to the participant’s own geographical area and agency. By identifying and addressing barriers, creating conversations, and looking at how small, simple steps create an avenue to other steps, participants will come away with the beginning of a toolkit specific to their needs. Participants just need to bring their phones, a pen, an open mind, and be prepared to walk away with the start of a plan to create a safer space.

1.5 DVS Credits: Prevention

Legislative Advocacy
Presenter: Nicole Morella, MA Legislative advocacy has been a critical piece in our collective effort to improve responses to domestic violence and reduce incidents of violence in our communities. Such advocacy has led to laws that have increased victim safety, increased offender accountability, as well as allocated funding to increase our efforts and the network of services available for victims and survivors. In this workshop, participants will learn about the legislative process in New Jersey. An overview will be provided regarding the structure of legislative districts, the State Assembly and Senate as well as how an issue or problem becomes a bill and how that bill may become signed into law.
Participants will learn where to find information about pending legislation, the different types of legislation that may be of concern to survivors and providers, and questions to consider when analyzing the content of a bill. Finally, participants will learn how advocates and survivors can influence policy by communicating with sponsors, testifying in public hearings, and contacting legislators to support or oppose legislation.1.5 DVS Credits: Organizing for Change
Responding to the Trauma in a Trauma Informed Way

Presenter: Catherine Hernesh, MA Advocates in the Domestic Violence field know how stressful and exhausting dealing with clients’ trauma from intimate partner violence can be, and many advocates have been trained and prepared to deal with the trauma of coercive control. As our shelters have been charged with accepting and supporting clients with more and more complex issues, many advocates have shared that they are unsure of how to approach clients who are overtly angry and acting out, who isolate, and/ or who present as emotionally shut down. This workshop will explore the reasons that these clients may present with various trauma responses, and how advocates can appropriately support traumatized clients by drawing on the training and skills they already possess. Through a combination of didactic slides, discussion, and activities, participants will come to understand how to support all levels of trauma and trauma response. Understanding of trauma-informed care and the importance of providing trauma-informed services to clients will be emphasized.

1.5 DVS Credits: Mental Health

A Comprehensive Program for Managing Volunteers in IPV Programs

Presenter: Pam Drager, MSW, LSW Many volunteer coordinators take on their position without formal training in best practices for volunteer management and engagement. Managing volunteers within the field of interpersonal violence adds to the importance of avoiding pitfalls. By developing a comprehensive program strategy, you will empower volunteers to provide crucial interventions for clients and also protect the agency from risk. This workshop will discuss some of the essential elements that each volunteer program should have, including policies and procedures, interview protocols, termination processes, and training evaluations. The key components of a volunteer manual will be discussed. Participants will learn the value of volunteer retention and engagement. This workshop will provide tangible skills, resources and examples that participants can bring back to their agencies. There will be small group discussions where participants will be able to network with other volunteer managers.

1.5 DVS Credits: Community Resources, Networking & Advocacy

Implications of Intersectionality on Violence Against Women

Presenter: Rupande Mehta, MPA Although intersectionality as an idea has been around for a long time, its need has often been misunderstood or misguided. While the discrimination subjected to an African American woman compared to a Caucasian woman is thought to be established, how does this vary when you throw in other intersectional factors such as: immigrant status, religion, race and varying aspects of gender norms? In today’s volatile political climate, where gender discrimination is set to become the norm, how does our lack of understanding of these other factors affect how we offer services to those affected by violence? In addition to understanding these concepts, in this ‘workshop, attendees will gain an understanding of what intersectionality means, and how it can imply different identity aspects indifferent social groups. They will also learn about how intersectionality affects the approach to violence against women through a series of differing narratives and activities that describe the circumstance, choice and consequence facing survivors. We will look at evaluating how economic costs of VAW have confirmed the impact of intersectionality, as well. Participants will explore concrete solutions to change these narratives. We will explore trauma informed advocacy methods of cultural competency and cultural humility to challenge existing assumptions and educate activists to account for intersectionality. Using activities and examples we aim to build a model that ensures inclusivity for all survivors of violence, and helps build responses that speak equally to all identities.

1.5 DVS Credits: Values & Attitudes

About the Keynote

Advocacy is more important than ever to build power and protect our communities. It enables us to shape the public debate on important social issues and is one of the most powerful tools we have to create change. As part of the Alliance for Justice Bolder Advocacy team, I provide foundations and nonprofits the confidence, tools, and resources to effectively advocate to advance their missions. During this time of great political change, many nonprofits that have hesitated to step into the advocacy realm now feel compelled to speak out, and those already engaging in advocacy want to learn how they can engage in more sophisticated strategies and campaigns. The time is now for your organization to BE BOLD and to encourage your allies and coalitions to speak up and out on issues that matter to them and to you.

Keely Monroe serves as Counsel for the Bolder Advocacy Initiative at Alliance for Justice. She consults with and trains nonprofit organizations on the rules and strategies for legal and effective advocacy, including lobbying, election-related activity, and ballot measure advocacy. Before joining AFJ, Keely was the Director of Campus & Community Programs at the national office of IfWhenHow: Lawyering for Reproductive Justice in Oakland, CA, where she provided guidance to over one hundred IfWhenHow chapters across the country and supported their advocacy at the state and community level. As a passionate advocate for reproductive rights, health, and justice issues, Keely further serves these movements as a member of the National Board of Directors for Sexuality Information and Education Council of the United States (SIECUS) and as an advisory board member for Women Engaged. Keely holds a B.A. from Fordham University and graduated from the University of California, Hastings College of the Law in 2011. She is licensed by the State Bar of California.

About the Musician

Macheis Wind is an award-winning musician, child advocate and author, and the founder and director of Guitar Tree, a non-profit organization. He has spent more than two decades dedicated to bringing the healing power of music to children and adults in venues where trauma and emotional pain are intense and ever present – what he calls the \“hidden worlds\”. Macheis has developed many creative approaches to enhancing healing and empowerment in these volatile and complex settings. Often, he will create songs out of client’s lives and stories that are beautiful, thought provoking and speak to the compassion in all of us. He has written about this work and about his own personal journey in his upcoming book, \“More Than This: The Music, Healing, and Triumph Over Violence.\”

Location:

Rutgers University
Busch Campus Student Center
Piscataway, NJ
For directions to the conference, click here

Tickets:

Early Registration: Register early through Friday, June 2, 2017
NJ Certified Domestic Violence Specialists (DVS) by June 2 | $65
All other registration by June 2 | $75
All registration after June 2 | $85

Registration:

Pay via credit card or check. Checks are mailed to NJCEDV and must be received for registration to be complete.
Select your morning and afternoon workshops during the checkout process.
If you have trouble registering, please call our office and we will gladly assist you, (609) 584-8107.
Continental breakfast and lunch will be provided.
Training rooms are accessible. Please call or email us at info@njcedv.org if you have special needs.

8 - 8:45 a.m. | Registration & Continental Breakfast
9 - 9:15 a.m. | Opening -Macheis Win
9:15 - 10:15 a.m.| Keynote- Keely Monroe, Esq.
10:30 - 12:00 p.m. | Workshop Session I
12:15 - 1:15 p.m. | Lunch
1:30 - 3:00 p.m. | Workshop Session II

HIGHLIGHTS & ACTIVITIES

  • Art Display
  • Vendors
  • Raffle
  • DVS Credits
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